Kimmie's Special Projects Blog

Child Handprint Quilt-finished
You don’t need to be an expert quilter to make this memorable project. I designed, constructed and stitched this quilt for our school auction.  I’m proud to say it was the high seller!  By using the handprints of each child, you can piece together those precious memories forever! 

 

 

 

Child Handprint Quilt-painting hand 1
Creating your own child handprint quilt requires these simple basics:


-fabric 10” x 10” squares (I used a heavy denim)
-fabric for the back
-pre-washed batting
-acrylic paints, found at any craft store
-foam brush
-sewing machine
-sewing accessories (pins, thread, scissors, etc)

 

 

Child Handprint Quilt-painting hand 2
Brush acrylic paint onto the hands of each child.  Make sure to thoroughly cover the hand, including fingers.   Help press the hand (s) onto the denim.  Younger children can use both hands while older ones may only be able to fit one handprint on the square

 

 

 

Child Handprint Quilt-painting hand 3
One of my favorite things is teaching kids how to be creative.  As you can see, kids love participating, especially when they get to be messy! Remember, close adult supervision is important to capture clean hand prints without smears.   

 

 

 

Child Handprint Quilt-initial block
Here’s one block that has just been printed.  I recommend pre-washing the denim and ironing before I even begin.  You never know how much some fabrics could shrink.  For seam allowance, I tape around the borders.  This serves as a guide to ensure no part of the handprint gets sewn into the seam when piecing.

 

 

Child Handprint Quilt-layout
I let each child in the class pick out their favorite color.  What a lively and fun piece, huh?  In this picture, I am experimenting with various layouts.  I choose to alternate between boys and girls.  As you can see, I also included the 3 teachers by using a rainbow of colors for their prints.

 

 

 

Child Handprint Quilt-samples
Here I am playing with various ways of displaying each child’s name next to their handprints.  Because my machine does basic fonts, I decide to stitch the names in silver thread.  Fabric and puff pens also work great, depending on the age of the child.

 

Child Handprint Quilt-Kimmie stitching
This particular quilt is 5 blocks by 5 blocks.  Because I want to complete the quilt (inside joke with many quilters,) I keep the overall assembly very simple. 

Once all blocks are trimmed to the exact size of 10” by 10”, I start working in vertical rows.  Pin the blocks with the right sides together.  Most quilters prefer a scant ¼” seam.  However for this basic denim quilt, you can also choose a ½” seam.  Accuracy is important so that your blocks come out aligned.  Take it from a quilter who has ripped out a lot of seams!

 

Child Handprint Quilt-1st row
Yeah!  While this quilt may have started out messy with plenty of youngsters and wet paint, progress is being made!

 

Child Handprint Quilt-Kimmie
A 2nd row is now stitched.  What’s so neat about this project is that your child's early years are always preserved.  For a different look, include the whole family and even the pets.

 

Child Handprint Quilt-finished
Because 4 more squares are needed, I photograph the kids and print (mirror image) onto photo transfer paper.  Found at most craft stores, this is a way to add even more memories.  Iron each image carefully with a press cloth.  To make them “pop,” I outline the pictures using a machine satin stitch (wide zigzag) in matching silver thread.  Once all of the blocks are sewn, press the seams open.  As you can see in this finished picture, I did not use any sashing or extra binding.  I simply made a “sandwich” out of the quilt front, back and batting.  Turn inside-out to baste and press again.  For the quilting, I stitch in the ditch down and across the rows using a matching thread.  For the binding, I simply sew a ¾” seam around the entire quilt.  I used a variegated thread in primary colors that really shows up in person.

This truly is quilting…simplified! 

Kimmie

 
 
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